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Posted by on in General
Time to Break the Chain

Since the Spending Review decision to cancel the CCS Competition, the UK Government and industry have been working hard behind the scenes to think about a new approach for CCS. Then Brexit happened. Whatever else one might surmise about the impact of this result, one thing is certain – there is likely to be a long period of upheaval and uncertainty as the UK attempts to unhinge itself from Brussels.

In some ways, this actually presents an opportunity to reinforce and reposition climate change arguments and the importance of CCS. There are positive signs that the UK is not backing down on its commitments – only last week (30th June), the Government announced that the UK will legislate for a 57% emissions reductions target for the fifth carbon budget (covering the period 2028-2032) in line with the advice of the Committee on Climate Change.

Political turmoil or not, the UK remains a signatory to the Paris Agreement and the goal of limiting the global temperature increase to well below 2°C. Meeting this goal will require serious action from all countries around the world and the UK must play its part. On the 29th June, the CCSA held an important joint workshop with the Carbon Sequestration Leadership Forum (CSLF) on “CCS Post-Paris: Realising Global Ambitions”. At this workshop, one presenter pointed to the importance of CCS in enabling countries to have “options” available by which the aim of the Paris Agreement can be met. The point was made that because CCS is essential to decarbonising industrial sectors (such as steel, cement, refining etc) as well as power, has a role to play in decarbonising heat and is the best option for producing zero-carbon hydrogen as a fuel – countries will find it exceedingly difficult to meet the Paris Agreement if CCS is not available. Furthermore, the contribution that bioenergy with CCS (bioCCS or BECCS) could make is enormous as it actually enables emissions to be removed from the atmosphere. Imagine the massive benefit this could have, particularly in terms of offsetting hard-to-decarbonise sectors such as aviation.

The big question we are now faced with in the UK (aside from the Brexit fallout of course!) is: how to get CCS on track?

Guest blog from Indira Mann, Communications & Knowledge Exchange Executive, SCCS

The last few days have brought yet another body blow to the UK’s steel industry as it struggles to remain viable within a changeable global market. This marketplace, for industry in general, will also begin to feel the impact of a rising carbon price and a client base that is demanding more sustainable products. Could this shift in emphasis provide light at the end of the tunnel for the UK’s industrial sector and can it rise to the carbon challenge?

A cross-party group of parliamentarians and external stakeholders met at Westminster last week to discuss UK industry’s vision for tackling its emissions through carbon capture and storage (CCS). This range of technologies provides the means of capturing carbon dioxide (CO2) from industrial facilities and power plants for storage in suitable geological sites deep underground.

On the same day we released our report, Achieving a low-carbon society: CCS expertise and opportunity in the UK. Our aim was to highlight the UK’s unique and enviable set of assets, which can deliver a CCS industry, allowing us to meet crucial emissions targets cost-effectively – in line with the international climate agreement reached in Paris – while supporting industry and powering the economy.

Posted by on in General

In November last year I blogged – rather emotively I might add – about the decision of the UK Government to withdraw funding for Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) in the 2015 Spending Review.

The decision came as a shock, not least because it called into question UK commitment to climate change and added to growing concerns around the confidence of project developers and financiers to invest in UK low carbon infrastructure.

If we needed any further evidence that the implications of the decision were profound, then that evidence came today in the form of a letter from the Committee on Climate Change to Secretary of State Amber Rudd.

Set in the context of the Committee’s advice on the 5th Carbon Budget and the recent global climate agreement at COP 21, the Committee reiterates much of the evidence it published in 2015 around CCS cost reduction pathways. Once again the Committee confirms that the costs of achieving UK emissions reduction targets for 2050 would likely double if CCS is not developed at the pace and scale it suggests is necessary.

Posted by on in General

It is the day after the darkest day for CCS in UK history, and the CCSA and its members are still in shock.

The same words keep repeating themselves; devastated, sad, bewildered. The question; Why? And why now? Amazingly, a day later and the silence from Government is deafening. Only the two-line statement to the London Stock Exchange can be found.

Posted by on in General
Capturing Knowledge for Meaningful Action

Guest blog from Indira Mann, Communications & Knowledge Exchange Executive, SCCS

 

It could well be the turning point our planet needs, but the Paris climate talks at the end of this month will struggle to achieve their stated intention – a meaningful climate change agreement by world leaders – unless more than five nations include or even consider Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) as part of a concerted approach to tackling carbon emissions.

The importance of CCS as a means of arresting global warming cannot be downplayed. The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change itself has stated that, without its large-scale deployment, the world will fail to keep a global temperature increase to within 2°C. A recent report by the Global CCS Institute lists 22 large-scale CCS projects, either already operating or getting very close, which prove to a stubbornly sceptical world that the technology works and can be deployed by many more countries right now. And if cost is still a perceived barrier, analysis by the International Energy Agency suggests that CCS will actually reduce decarbonisation costs further down the road.

So if we are serious about averting dangerous climate change and the technology exists, what might governments, regulators and potential project developers still need? Two high-level joint industry projects, led by the SCCS research partnership with support from industry and government, sought to provide some of the answers. Here are a few of our findings.